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Maegen gets ready to sample a pine dugout canoe.
Ph.D. student Maegen Rochner prepares to sample a dugout canoe made from longleaf pine in the
Museum of Scotland County, North Carolina.
Lauren Stachowiak gets ready to sample a fire-scarred pine on Big Pine Key.
Ph.D. student Lauren Stachowiak gets ready to sample a fire-scarred slash pine,
Big Pine Key in the lower Florida Keys.
The beautiful Magdalena Mountains in New Mexico, where we've sampled extensively.
The beautiful Magdalena Mountains in New Mexico, where we've sampled extensively
for both fire and climate history.
Savannah Collins and Sarah Jones Wayman present posters at the Southeastern Division of the AAG conference in Roanoke, Virginia.
Savannah Collins and Sarah Jones Wayman present their posters at the 2013 SEDAAG
conference in Roanoke, Virginia.
Annie Blankenship (right) looks on as we sample a timber from an early 19th century saltpeter vat in Van Buren County, Tennessee
Annie Blankenship (right) looks on as we sample a timber from an early 19th century saltpeter vat in a
cave in Van Buren County, Tennessee.
Undergraduate student Brooke Pearson cores a Virginia pine, Norris Dam State Park, Tennessee.
Undergraduate student Brooke Pearson cores a Virginia pine,
Norris Dam State Park, Tennessee.
Tree rings on an oak section from a historic corn mill in Virginia.
Tree rings on an oak section from a historic grist mill, Graves Mill, Virginia.
Ph.D. student Maegen Rochner coring a tulip poplar log in North Carolina.
Ph.D. student Maegen Rochner coring a massive tulip poplar log in a historic cabin
near Valles Crucis, North Carolina.
Former LTRS student Monica Rother saws into a fire-scarred ponderosa pine in the Zuni Mountains, New Mexico.
Former LTRS student Monica Rother saws into a fire-scarred ponderosa pine stump
in the Zuni Mountains, New Mexico.
Savannah Collins explains wavelet analysis to the NADEF group, Acadia National Park, Maine.
Former LTRS MS student Savannah Collins explains wavelet analysis to the 2015 NADEF group,
Acadia National Park, Maine.
Lab director Henri Grissino-Mayer prepares to saw into a whitebark pine.
Lab director Henri Grissino-Mayer prepares to saw into a whitebark pine in the
Beartooth Mountains, northwestern Wyoming.
Undergraduate students Hudson Kelly and Katy Caudle coring a pine, Norris Dam State Park, Tennessee.
Undergraduate students Hudson Kelly and Katy Caudle coring a massive Virginia pine,
Norris Dam State Park, Tennessee.
The distinct oak rings on a wood panel from a famous painting made during the early 17th century.
The distinct oak rings on a wood panel from a famous painting made during the early 17th century.
This living Table Mountain pine was sampled for fire history back in 1993!
This living Table Mountain pine was sampled for fire history at the 1993 NADEF, Brush Mountain, Virginia.
Legendary dendrochronologist Tom Harlan coaches Henri at the 2010 NADEF.
At the 2010 NADEF, legendary dendrochronologist Tom Harlan (right) coaches lab director Henri
about bristlecone pines in the White Mountains.
From the summit of beautiful Norumbega Mountain in Maine.
The summit of beautiful Norumbega Mountain where the Climate Group at the 2015 NADEF collected
their samples in Acadia National Park, Maine.
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The LTRS

Here at the University of Tennessee, we are proud to house a world-class state-of-the-art laboratory for tree-ring research. The Laboratory of Tree-Ring Science is supported by the Department of Geography and the College of Arts and Sciences, supplemented by funds from the National Science Foundation and many private donations. The laboratory is housed in the Burchfiel Geography Building and in the Science and Engineering Research Facility, occupying four spacious, well-equipped rooms with all the amenities. We are a dynamic and energetic group consisting of faculty members, graduate students, and undergraduate students, all actively involved in dendrochronology, engaged in various research projects that cover archaeology to fire history to climate reconstruction. We regularly engage in active research with faculty and graduate students in the Departments of Anthropology, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Earth and Planetary Sciences, and Forestry, Wildlife, and Fisheries, as well as with personnel from Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the National Park Service, and the Tennessee Valley Authority.

Come Study With Us!

If you're interesting in joining a dynamic laboratory engaged in the full spectrum of dendrochronological research to further your graduate and professional careers, contact me and I'll be glad to talk with you about opportunities we have available. I can promise you that your training in our laboratory will prepare you for a satisfying and rewarding career upon graduation.

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